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Crafts in Bloom: A Paper Flower How-To

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Photos by Ina Jacobe

Surrounded by steel and concrete, our urban dwellings could do with a little more nature. Given the fast-paced lives city folk live, however, plants may be a little difficult to maintain while filling vases with fresh flowers can be costly.

For more manageable décor that can add life to a living room, paper flowers offer a do-it-yourself alternative. Bringing these folded flowers to the fore is Vicky Velasco, who left her job as a visual merchandiser for Fully Booked to let her paper craft business come into full bloom.

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“The materials are really accessible—it’s just paper, scissors, and glue,” says Vicky of how easy it is to plant one’s creative seeds in paper floristry, especially for moms looking for an artsy activity to share with the kids. “You can also be creative with the materials you use, using different colors, prints, or textures. The possibilities are endless.”

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Paper florist Vicky Velasco

While Vicky has adorned Cary Santiago gowns for a magazine shoot and is contemplating other objects she can create, she shares an easy introduction with The Start. Step-by-step and one petal at a time, you can create a delicate and minimalist floral accent for your wall or table setting. The best part is you don’t even need to water it.

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MATERIALS

Glue

Paintbrush (for dabbing glue)

Palette

Paper (with thickness between 100 to 120 GSM, for ideal firmness and flexibility)

INSTRUCTIONS

 1. Fold a sheet of paper into as many petals as you need for the paper flower. “I usually recommend folding the letter-size paper into six parts,” says Vicky.

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2. Once you have folded your sheet, cut a petal shape out of the smaller rectangle or square. To ensure a symmetrical petal shape, fold over the first layer after you’re done cutting the first half of the petals.

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3. Cut a small line at the center of the petals. This line will create two flaps. Glue one flap over the other; this will cause the outer edge of the petal to rise a little.

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4. You can also add a curve to the outer edges of the petals by sharpening each petal upward and outward with a cutter or scissor blade.

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5. Organize the petals in a circle, with one on top of the other. Once they’re evenly spaced out, glue the center together.

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A note from Vicky:  “You can play around with the shapes of the flowers. They can be pointed or rounded at the end, or you can invent different shapes altogether! You can also layer flowers on top of each other. Use smaller petals that are raised more at the outer edges for the top layers.”

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Want to start a paper flower garden? Vicky will teach a paper flower workshop on January 31. Click for more details here

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A floral fantasy blooms in a 53Benitez guest room

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Wallflowers at a 53Benitez unit’s study

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A table setting you don’t need to water

1 Comment

  1. Pingback: Try These Ideas Using MUJI Products to Make Your Valentine's Presents Even More Special - Pepper.ph

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